Mackenzie’s Pyramid

The Mackenzie Pyramid is located between the largest towers of St. Andrews Place on Rodney Street. The tall granite pyramid represents the resting place of James Mackenzie, who earned his fortune by tapping the edge alley. Builds street tunnels and railways across Europe. However, he earned his living as a successful gambler.


Flavio
The Italian restaurant Flavio can be found on Tarbok Road in Houghton, but don’t be surprised if you miss it the first time.The small restaurant is actually based inside a former petrol station and serves delicious pasta dishes – but it’s only big enough to seat around 40 people so you’ll want to book in advance to secure a spot.

Queen Avenue
Queen Avenue is easy to ignore because the quiet little street is a long way from the busy Castle Street. Between Rudy’s Pizzeria and the Tune Hotel, Avenue is lined with Grade II-listed buildings that are now homegrown shops. In the past, Queen Avenue was home to insurance companies and financial businesses, and the area was named the “Business District”.But now it has hidden gems like dot art, r, h fine wine and abditory.

William Brown Street fossils

Fossils are hidden around St. George’s Hall.Immediate warning to egg buyers from Asda, Aldi and Sciencebury Experts who discovered it in 2001 believe that the fossils found in the rocks were brought from Britain and Norway.One is a shrimp-like creature buried in sandstone, and the other is the source of the 280-million-year-old William Brown Street fossil trees.

The smallest house in the UK

The house was built in 1850 by a sandwich between a bookie and a coke and a bottle pub.Legend has it that eight children were raised in a small house at one time.Other stories tell of another owner who once had to move to one side because of his “large structure.”Find out which restaurants are in use with your postcode

The last owners of the property were rehabilitated in 1925, and after years of publicity, the house restored its former glory when a new front was imposed in the 1980s.Since 1952 this house has become an integral part of the pub, which is adjacent to it and serves primarily as a storage area.

Hidden spring at St James’ Gardens

The only natural spring hidden inside St James’ Garden is Liverpool.This mystery revolves around a natural spring – called the Chalibeat for 200 years.Over the years, rumors have been circulating as to where the water is coming from, with some claiming that the water is a ghost.Exploring Liverpool’s harbor on foot is great, but exploring the dock on the boat is very special.

Floating Grace

Floating Grace takes visitors to a three-course lunch and wanders around the dock.Guests are served lamb, salmon or beef fries and taken to eight other docks, including Albert Dock’s sites, Weeping Dock, Queen’s Dock and Brunick Dock.

69A

Since its inception 30 years ago, owner Trevor Doswell and team have been selling exclusive pieces worldwide using 69A.The vintage antique shop has been in most buildings since its opening in 1976, but has always been on Renshaw Street.

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